‘Beijing is far away’

Studying centre-province and inter-province relationships in China from the perspective of the provinces, provides a new framework for analyzing political and economic developments in China. Four distinct phenomena deserve examination:
localism, provincialism, regionalism and transnationalism.

Will Emerging Powers Promote Democracy?

The decline of Western dominance, symbolized by the financial crisis in 2008 and the rise of emerging actors such as China, India and Brazil, will fundamentally change the way decisions are made at the international level. Apart from changing the way decisions are made, the rise of non-established powers such as India and Brazil on the one hand and China on the other, will also have an impact on the international discourse on political values and systems of governance.

Border Provinces in Foreign Policy: China’s West and India’s Northeast

China has given greater leeway in economic matters, to these provinces of the west under its Western Development Strategy (WDS). In India, too, there is greater attention being paid to connecting India’s Look East Policy (LEP), a foreign policy initiative, with the economic development of the Indian Northeast. Might the WDS and the LEP be compared?

Guns, Blankets and Bird Flu

The India-Myanmar border regions form a forgotten frontier in the Indian and global imagination but violence, trade and transnational challenges such as drug-trafficking and the spread of diseases have kept both a regional identity as well as specific community identities alive.

China-Pakistan Relations: Reinterpreting the Nexus

“The Afghans they hate us,
The Indians wanna bring us to our knees
How long will it be Lord, till we piss off the Chinese
I got the blues”
Saad Haroon

The States in Indian Foreign Policy

This presentation focuses on one particular aspect of centre-province relations in India – the nature of influence that Indian provinces (or States) exercise on national foreign policymaking.